Guttering - Common problems and how to solve them.

Maintaining gutters is the most important thing you can do to prevent water damage to your home.


Gutters are designed to do one thing -- channel water away from the foundation -- and they're critical to protecting the structural integrity of your house. But in order for gutters to do their job properly, they have to be kept in shape and free of clogs, holes, and sags.

Luckily, most common gutter problems are easy for homeowners to fix themselves. And it's worth the effort. "Gutters are the most overlooked component in a lot of homes. Basic maintenance can really save your foundation. Without that the house will deteriorate structurally. That's a punch in the wallet no one wants." says Austin Pellerito, Owner of Michigan Gutter Man in Macomb County, Michigan.

Here are the gutter problems that the pros see most often, and the recommended solutions.


Clogged Gutters

This is the most common problem of all. Left untended, gutters and downspouts get so clogged with debris that they're rendered useless. The excess weight of leaves, twigs, and standing water can also make them sag and pull away from the fascia.


Clean them at least once a year, and twice a year if you have a lot of trees nearby. Shawn Reed from Pre Closing Inspection recommends that you clean your gutters at least once a year and make plans to clean them after big storms. Storms and high winds are key factors in how large debris can make its way into your guttering.


You can unclog your own gutters if you're comfortable on a ladder, don't mind getting wet and dirty, and don't have an extremely tall house. After you've cleared the muck, flush them with a garden hose to make sure they're flowing properly. If you'd prefer, you can hire someone to do the job for you for starting around $250, depending on the size of your house.


Another option for dealing with chronically clogged gutters is to outfit them with gutter covers. These include mesh screens, clip-on grates, and porous foam. They still need regular maintenance, though, and the cost can be more than the gutters themselves.


Sagging Gutters and Gutters Pulling Away from the House

This is usually a problem with the hangers, the hardware that secures the gutters to the fascia. They might have deteriorated over time, the fasteners may have backed out of the wood, or they're spaced too far apart to support the weight of full gutters. The cost to fix sagging gutters yourself is cheap; hangers generally cost $10 or less apiece, and the fasteners run about $1 each.


Leaks and Holes

Leaky gutter joints can be sealed by caulking the joint from the inside with gutter sealant. A tube costs about $5. Very small holes can be filled with gutter sealant. Larger holes will require a patch. If you can't find a gutter patching kit at the hardware store, you can make a patch from metal flashing.


Improperly Pitched Gutters

Gutters need to be pitched toward the downspouts for the water to flow properly. You want at least a quarter inch of slope for every 10 feet. Get on a ladder after a rainstorm and look in the gutter; if there's standing water, it's not pitched properly.


To correct this yourself, you'll need to measure from the peak to the downspout. Snap a chalk line between the two and find the spots where the gutter is out of alignment. You might be able to push it up into place by bending the hanger. If that doesn't solve the problem, you might need to take a section down and rehang it. If you have seamless gutters, call the company that installed them to correct the problem.


Downspouts Draining Too Close to the Foundation

Downspouts need to extend several feet from the house, or they'll dump right into the basement. Gutter extensions attached to the bottom of the downspout will discharge water well beyond the foundation. They're inexpensive and easy to install.


Missing Gutters

If your house has no gutters at all, consider investing in a system. The cost depends on the material. Most residential gutters are aluminum, which is lightweight and durable. Aluminum gutters range from about $4.50 to $8.50 per linear foot installed. On a 2,000-square-foot house with about 180 linear feet of gutters, that's roughly $800 to $1,500.

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